Tag Archives: reactive extensions

RxCpp 2

RxCpp 2 and API

The last article on rxcpp was based on a now obsolete version of RxCpp. The key contributor to the library, Kirk Shoop, has kindly provided a rewrite based on the newer, 2.0 API of the library: see the pull request, upon which this article is based.

Since the first article, the project has been enriched with somewhat more readable GIVEN/WHEN/THEN-style tests using Catch [1. i.e. create.cpp].

Still Ticking: Scheduler and Coordination in RxCpp 2

The previous articles give examples of managing periodic events, such as ticker ticks and measurements in c++. The following example creates an event loop that will be used for coordinated output of various events to the console:

auto scheduler = rxcpp::schedulers::make_same_worker(
    rxcpp::schedulers::make_event_loop().create_worker()
);

auto coordination = rxcpp::identity_one_worker(scheduler);

One such sequence of events is some kind of measurement [2. Observe the convergence of the API towards the C# version.]

auto measure = rxcpp::observable<>::interval(
        // when to start
        scheduler.now() + std::chrono::milliseconds(250),
        // measurement frequency
        std::chrono::milliseconds(250),
        coordination)
    // take Hz values instead of a counter
    .map([&FM](int) { return FM.Hz(); });

auto measure_subscription = measure
    .subscribe([](int val) {
        std::cout << val << std::endl;
    });

Why didn’t it tick?

If this code were the end of the main program, there wouldn’t be any observable ticks, as all the objects would be destroyed before the first scheduled event. To see the code in action, we shall wait for some condition that will change when we’re done. This step is not necessary if there’s a GUI toolkit event loop that keeps objects alive, but it has to be simulated for a console example.

To demonstrate the subscription change and wait for some time, we’ll wait twice for an atomic variable to become zero:

std::atomic<long> pending(2);

...

// after all subscriptions defined
while (pending) {
    sleep(1000); // wait for ticker and measure to finish
}

Tick and Stop

The other ticker will have another period, will only tick 10 times, and then decrement the pending counter:

auto ticker = rxcpp::observable<>::interval(
    scheduler.now() + std::chrono::milliseconds(500),
    std::chrono::milliseconds(500),
    coordination);

ticker
    .take(10)
    .subscribe([](int val) {
        std::cout << "tick " << val << std::endl;
    },[&](){
        --pending; // take completed the ticker
    });

Now, we can schedule the termination of the measurement (decrement pending) subscription halfway through the 10-tick run. This scheduling is done on the same scheduler that is running all the subscriptions:

scheduler.create_worker().schedule(scheduler.now() + std::chrono::seconds(2), 
    [&](const rxcpp::schedulers::schedulable&) {
        std::cout << "Canceling measurement ..." << std::endl;
        measure_subscription.unsubscribe(); // cancel measurement
        --pending; // signal measurement canceled
    });

The result:

63
tick 1
63
61
tick 2
63
61
tick 3
63
62
Canceling measurement ...
tick 4
tick 5
tick 6
tick 7
tick 8
tick 9
tick 10

Thanks, Kirk & other library contributors!

Code @ github

Next: deterministic testing of concurrent behavior

No Events: ReactiveUI Windows Forms MVVM-Style

Review

designed using http://viperneo.github.io/winforms-modernui/

This is the next post in the series, looking first at Reactive Extensions (RX) to simplify writing Windows Forms UI logic, then using a viewmodel shared between a WPF gui implementation and a rewritten WinForms version using ReactiveUI, stopping at a short article on testing the viewmodels.

passedtest

ReactiveUI News

ReactiveUI API has been quite volatile for the last year, and this series is in need of an update[0. See ReactiveUI Design Guidelines]. A CodeProject author gardner9032 published a nice teaser article, showing the ReactiveUI mechanism for writing simplified Viewmodel-View bindings [1. see article @CodeProject], which serves as primary trigger for this post.

There’s plenty of news and updated articles on Paul Betts’ log, providing a good resource for updates on the API. Phil Haack’s blog is also a superb resource for explanations and commentaries on the use of ReactiveUI in real-world applications.

The ReactiveUI project is quite active, as the community seems to have grokked the jist of it, while the list of supported platforms has become more than convincing.

Getting rid of events

The enabling feature of ReactiveUI is writing declarative UI glue code, and if the viewmodels are based on Reactive Extensions, then declarative C# style can be used throughout the project. The previous ReactiveUI Windows Forms examples converted an event sequence into an observable sequence of values. In this example, that will be accomplished conveniently by the ReactiveUI WinForms lbrary. The viewmodels also contained some imperative code. For this article, the viewmodels will not be reused from the previous articles, but written from scratch.

ViewModel

s. code

The viewmodel’s task is the same: something is ticking in the background, while words are counted in the input text asynchronously, and the calculation is throttled to 0.5 seconds. The viewmodel boilerplate is simplified using ReactiveUI.ReactiveObject.

Output (read-only) properties

The ReactiveUI-way of creating output properties is through ObservableAsPropertyHelper.

private readonly ObservableAsPropertyHelper<string> backgroundTicker;
public string BackgroundTicker
{
    get
    {
        return backgroundTicker.Value;
    }
    //...
}

The constructor of the viewmodel receives an IScheduler for scheduling on the correct thread, and an IObservable, which will be a stream of input from the view. Observe the ToProperty helper:

public MyViewModel(IScheduler scheduler, IObservable<string> input)
{
    Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))
        .ObserveOn(scheduler)
        .Select(_ => DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString())
        .ToProperty(this, x => x.BackgroundTicker, out backgroundTicker);
    //...
}

Word counting logic is implemented in a similar fashion by transforming the incoming stream of strings.

View

s. code

To remove yet more boilerplate code, WinForms Form specialization implements the ReactiveUI.IViewFor interface. This allows for largely simplified run-time and compile-time checked bindings, avoiding using strings for property names. The implementation is straightforward, and pays off once the views become more complex than this example:

IViewFor

public MyViewModel VM { get; private set; }

object IViewFor.ViewModel
{
    get { return VM; }
    set { VM = (MyViewModel)value; }
}

MyViewModel IViewFor<MyViewModel>.ViewModel
{
    get { return VM; }
    set { VM = value; }
}

Bindings

None of the controls in the designed WinForm have wired events or bindings set from the designer. The glue code is reduced to instantiating the viewmodel …

VM = new MyViewModel(
    new System.Reactive.Concurrency.ControlScheduler(this),
    this.WhenAnyValue(x => x.inputBox.Text)
);

… and declaring the bindings[2. The ReactiveUI WinForms implementation seems not to support fully read-only fields using default bindings yet, hence an empty setter in the viewmodel] [3. The scheduler is from Windows Forms helpers].

this.Bind(VM, x => x.BackgroundTicker, x => x.tickerBox.Text);
this.Bind(VM, x => x.WordCount, x => x.wordCountBox.Text);

Source

@github

ReactiveUI 6 and ViewModel Testing

Testability and ReactiveUI

ReactiveUI XAML example

In the previous articles about ReactiveUI I’ve claimed without bringing any evidence that writing ViewModels using ReactiveObjects brings about testability. While the aspects of testing Rx and ReactiveUI have been treated at length in the respective authors’ blogs linked herein, this post is intended as a quick glance for the impatient online surfer at the hello-world testing code, which has been written “post-mortem” [1. as in, not within TDD] as a follow-up to the previous articles.

An update to ReactiveUI 6

Paul Betts and contributors have been busy simplifying and extending the library [2. which now also targets Xamarin and Windows Phone 8 and Windows Store Apps]. There are some extension methods now that help creating observables from properties, and transforming observables to properties. In the example ViewModel from previous articles, there’s an observable stream of strings that is simply transformed into a property defined as follows:

ObservableAsPropertyHelper<string> _BackgroundTicker;
public string BackgroundTicker
{
    get { return _BackgroundTicker.Value; }
}

In the constructor, the helper is now initialized without using strings:

public WordCounterModel(IObservable<string> someBackgroundTicker)
{
someBackgroundTicker
    .ToProperty(this, x => x.BackgroundTicker, out _BackgroundTicker);
...
}

instead of string-based error-prone

_BackgroundTicker = new ObservableAsPropertyHelper<string>(
	someBackgroundTicker, _ => raisePropertyChanged("BackgroundTicker")
);

For the actual changes in ReactiveUI, consult Paul Betts’ insightful log.

A simple test

Since the tests have been written after writing the example code, I’ve been searching for the “Generate Unit Test” context menu in Visual Studio 2013. The context menu is not there, but luckily some enthusiasts recreated the functionality partly: → Unit Test Generator.

After the initial set-up and

failedtest

here’s the simple test of the word count property:

[TestMethod]
public void WordCounterModelTest()
{
    var mock = new Mock<IObservable<string>>();
    var vm = new WordCounterModel(mock.Object);

    vm.WordCount.Should().Be(0);

    vm.TextInput = "bla!";
    vm.WordCount.Should().Be(1);

    vm.TextInput = "bla, bla!!";
    vm.WordCount.Should().Be(2);
}

In it, one can observe the use of MOQ for mocking a dummy and FluentAssertions for beautifully readable Spec/BDD-style assertions [3. I originally intended to use SpecFlow, but the specs refused to flow frictionlessly].

So, there’s no UI involved, and the UI is dogmatically bound from XAML with almost no code-behind.

Testing time series

The hello world example program simulated a dependency on some timed series of strings, ticking every second. While this is not specific to ReactiveUI, let’s make use of the test scheduler [4. see Intro to Rx]. For that, the time series should optionally depend on an injected IScheduler:

public class BackgroundTicker
{
    IScheduler scheduler = Scheduler.Default;

    public BackgroundTicker(IScheduler other_scheduler = null)
    {
        if (other_scheduler != null)
            scheduler = other_scheduler;
    }

    public IObservable<string> Ticker
    {
        get
        {
            return Observable
                .Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1), scheduler)
                .Select(_ => DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString());
        }
    }
}

The test instantiates a test scheduler, which is then advanced to make deterministic assertions. The code should speak for itself:

[TestMethod]
public void BackgroundTickerTest()
{
    (new TestScheduler()).With(scheduler =>
    {
        var ticker = new BackgroundTicker(scheduler);

        int count = 0;
        ticker.Ticker.Subscribe(_ => count++);
        count.Should().Be(0);

        scheduler.AdvanceByMs(1000);
        count.Should().Be(1);

        scheduler.AdvanceByMs(2000);
        count.Should().Be(3);
    });
}

Summary

passedtest

Code: https://github.com/d-led/reactiveexamples

Previous article: The WPF + ReactiveUI Refactored Version of the Responsive UI Hello World.

See also: the c++ version.